Socially conscious sf webmag The Future Fire, whose planned disability-themed science fiction anthology you may have heard about, is organizing a “blog hop”:

The Future Fire are crowdfunding another science fiction anthology, this time focussing on the issues that come with disability—and the intersections with other issues such as race, gender, sexuality, class, etc, as our friendly socio-politcal SF magazine are wont to do. You may have noticed the blog about it here: http://igg.me/at/accessingfuture

In order to help explain why such an SF discussion is necessary, the editors (Djibril al-Ayad and Kathryn Allan) brainstormed a bit of a blog hop with a bit of help from Jo Thomas (www.journeymouse.net) and Dylan Fox (www.dylanfox.net)

We’ve set up the questions so they can be asked of both writers and readers:

  1. Tell us about your Work In Progress (WIP) / Current Read (CR) and the world it’s set in.
  2. Who are the most powerful people in this world?
  3. Where does their power come from?
  4. What physical and/or mental characteristics underpin their positions of power?
  5. How does this affect the weakest people in the world?

Jo has launched the “Accessing The Future Fiction” blog hop at http://journeymouse.net/wp/?p=3677

If you want to take part and you haven’t been nominated, please do so. All that we ask is that you post a comment on this post so that others can find your part of the “Accessing The Future Fiction” blog hop and that you mention the Indiegogo fundraiser in your preamble! It would be nice if you could link in some other victims volunteers to carry on the blog hop, too.

Please share and participate! It would be cool to see a little Tumblr representation :)

Thai author Benjanun Sriduangkaew was nominated for this year’s Campbell Award for Best New Writer, which is for authors who first got published in the last two years. As she debuted two years ago (Expanded Horizons, "Chang’e Dashes From the Moon"), she won’t be eligible next year. However, I’d be awfully surprised if she doesn’t show up in the shortlists for other categories! Here’s her novelette “Courtship in the Country of Machine-Gods”.

In the shadow of machine–gods I tell wayfarers of a time when my people were a nightmare the color of hemorrhage and glinting teeth.
There are other narratives, but this is the one they want to hear most…

This year’s Campbell Award winner was Sofia Samatar. Her debut novel A Stranger in Olondria was shortlisted for like every major award, and “Selkie Stories Are for Losers” was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Short Story.

I hate selkie stories. They’re always about how you went up to the attic to look for a book, and you found a disgusting old coat and brought it downstairs between finger and thumb and said “What’s this?”, and you never saw your mom again.

bedbugsbiting

bedbugsbiting:

I teach it pretty regularly (the game) and at least one student a semester basically self-diagnoses and goes to the mental health center because of it. So, I do think it captures a certain kind of depression, but probably a narrow one.

If I were in high school, it might have been helpful to show it to my father or something. I think it would be good for someone with no experience with depression or who has never considered that they’re depressed. I’m not the target audience, which is totally fine. I’ve been on psych meds for over 20 years — yes, really.

But yeah, on the first screen I was like “What? I have a girlfriend? AND a job? What, am I a superhero?” And then I had a MOM and a brother and dinner with my parents and shit and it was like “WHOA, this is wackypants!”

I was happy when I got a kitten, though. That part was cool.

I started playing it when it first came out but stopped quite early because it was too depressing. By then I had been diagnosed, taken a few trips on the meds-go-round, and figured out I was probably the sort of person who was going to be depressed for the rest of their life. But I can see how it would be useful for newbies who haven’t figured it out.

I think it would be easier to capture other experiences of depression with a less literal approach, like using horror or sci-fi to create metaphors. Like, it’s a survival horror game but you’re a zombie or an alien and everyone else is human? Or something.

The latest from Hugo winner John Chu is “A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Proposed Trade-Offs for the Overhaul of the Barricade”:


  Generation after generation, engineers have maintained the barricade, a shield that protects civilization against Turbulence, this strange force that destroys both minds and machines. As Turbulence grows ever more intense and the barricade begins to fail, can Ritter live up to the demands of his father, an engineer the equal of any hero in the Five Great Classical Novels, as they struggle to prevent this civilization from falling like every civilization has before it?

The latest from Hugo winner John Chu is “A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Proposed Trade-Offs for the Overhaul of the Barricade”:

Generation after generation, engineers have maintained the barricade, a shield that protects civilization against Turbulence, this strange force that destroys both minds and machines. As Turbulence grows ever more intense and the barricade begins to fail, can Ritter live up to the demands of his father, an engineer the equal of any hero in the Five Great Classical Novels, as they struggle to prevent this civilization from falling like every civilization has before it?

This year’s Hugo for Best Short Story went to “The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere” by John Chu.


  In the near future water falls from the sky whenever someone lies (either a mist or a torrential flood depending on the intensity of the lie). This makes life difficult for Matt as he maneuvers the marriage question with his lover and how best to “come out” to his traditional Chinese parents.

This year’s Hugo for Best Short Story went to “The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere” by John Chu.

In the near future water falls from the sky whenever someone lies (either a mist or a torrential flood depending on the intensity of the lie). This makes life difficult for Matt as he maneuvers the marriage question with his lover and how best to “come out” to his traditional Chinese parents.

eschergirls

eschergirls:

I don’t know what kind of creature this character is, but apparently she doesn’t need something as inconvenient as organs…

She looks like she’s wearing her bones on the outside of her body, so maybe that’s what’s going on.

sorry but the third picture, her abs…those are, like, jesus penis abs.

not sorry

This year’s Hugo for Best Professional Artist went to Julie Dillon!

The heart of “Scholars’ Tower” is the great golden celestial globe, a tidy clockwork universe beset by controlled chaos. Books are jammed onto shelves in no particular order, overflow in messy piles on the floor. The cats go everywhere they please. The scholar in blue minds her step very carefully on the way down the stairs.

This year’s Hugo for Best Professional Artist went to Julie Dillon!

The heart of “Scholars’ Tower” is the great golden celestial globe, a tidy clockwork universe beset by controlled chaos. Books are jammed onto shelves in no particular order, overflow in messy piles on the floor. The cats go everywhere they please. The scholar in blue minds her step very carefully on the way down the stairs.